The Well-Tuned Brain

Why do we continually engage in behavioral patterns that are destructive to ourselves, to society, and to the environment? How did we become such a society of mindless consumers? Peter C. Whybrow, MD, author of the book, The Well-Tuned Brain: The Remedy for a Manic Society attempts to answer these questions and more. He is a psychiatrist and endocrinologist, and director of the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior at UCLA. Born and educated in England, he is the author of, among other books, A Mood Apart and the award-winning American Mania: When More Is Not Enough.

The Mind Club

Kurt Gray is the author of the new book, The Mind Club: Who thinks, what feels, and why it matters. Kurt Gray is a professor of social psychology at UNC Chapel Hill who received his PhD from Harvard University. He studies mind perception and morality, pondering such questions as “what is the nature of good and evil,” “can we ever truly know ourselves,” “why are humanoid robots so creepy,” and “what makes grandma’s cooking taste so good?”

Art and Human Nature

Alva Noë is the author of the new book Strange Tools: Art and Human Nature. Alva works on the nature of mind and human experience. What is art? Why does it matter to us? What does art reveal about our nature? Drawing on philosophy, art history, and cognitive science, and making provocative use of examples from all three of these fields, Alva offers new answers to such questions. He also shows why recent efforts to frame questions about art in terms of neuroscience and evolutionary biology alone have been, and will continue to be, unsuccessful.