Why are we here?

Lawrence Krauss is the author of the new book The Greatest Story Ever Told–So Far: Why are we here?. Lawrence is a renowned theoretical physicist, is director of the Origins Project at Arizona State University. He is the author of more than 300 scientific publications and nine books, including the international bestsellers, A Universe from Nothing and The Physics of Star Trek. The recipient of numerous awards, Krauss is a regular columnist for newspapers and magazines, including The New Yorker, and he appears frequently on radio, television, and in feature films.

Buddha and the Quantum: Hearing the Voice of Every Cell

Samuel Avery is author of Buddha and the Quantum: Hearing the Voice of Every Cell. Sam holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees in religion and he has taught university level courses. He has practiced meditation daily for forty-one years. Samuel has written a series of articles and books on the relationship of physics and consciousness to each other, including the books Transcendence of the Western Mind and The Dimensional Structure of Consciousness. Since 1973 he has lived with his wife on a small farm on the banks of the Nolin River in central Kentucky.

Bonk: The Curious Coupling of Science and Sex

Mary Roach is the author of the new book Bonk: The Curious Coupling of Science and Sex. Her previous books are Stiff: The Curious Loves of Human Cadavers and Spook: Science Tackles the Afterlife. Mary’s writing has appeared in such publications as Wired, National geographic, GQ, Vogue, and the New York Times Magazine. She is a former columnist at Salon.com and contributing editor at the science magazine Discover. Mary has always gravitated to the peculiar, covering subjects such as Eskimo food, carrot addiction and amputee bowling. She lives in Oakland, California.

The World Without Us

Alan Weisman discusses his book, The World Without Us. Alan is an award-winning journalist whose reports have appeared in Harper’s, The New York Times Magazine, The Atlantic Monthly, Discover, and on NPR, among others. A former contributing editor to The Los Angeles Times Magazine, he is a senior radio producer for Homelands Productions and teaches international journalism at the University of Arizona. His essay “Earth without People” (Discover magazine, February 2005), on which his new book expands, was selected for Best American Science Writing 2000 – 2007.

The Intelligent Universe

James Gardner, a well-known and widely-published complexity theorist, discusses his book The Intelligent Universe; A.I., ET, and the Emerging Mind of the Cosmos. His first book, Biocosm, was selected as one of the 10 best science books of 2003. James Gardner is a former Oregon State Senator and graduate of Yale University and Yale Law School. He currently works as a lawyer, reviews science books for The Oregonian, and lives in Portland with his family.