Trust Your Intuition in Response to Corona

Imagine an invisible enemy that can invade and destroy your body, unwittingly brought to you by a friend. It’s as if we are living a horror movie, and nobody knows the ending. It’s a strange movie and the popcorn tastes of hand sanitizer.

Nothing unsettles our security more than the threat of a deadly virus sneaking up on us. Together, we are experiencing an unprecedented level of uncertainty; a season of suffering that sometimes feels like it may never end. Around the world, people feel their lives in a stranglehold, stalked and stymied by an invisible and deadly enemy.

As we face social isolation, financial loss and a dangerous beast, it’s easy to feel powerless; but choosing our outlook can help us get through this. In Man’s Search for Meaning, Viktor Frankl wrote, “When we can no longer change a situation, we are challenged to change ourselves . . . Everything can be taken from a human but one thing: the last of the human freedoms—to choose one’s attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one’s own way.”

With that inner freedom, Frankl survived the Holocaust, found meaning in his suffering and empowered himself. He chose his response to tragedy, instead of letting contagious fear take over his mind. How can we find faith in total uncertainty? How can we balance our innate human need for connection while being as safe as possible? Can we trust the authorities? Can we trust our intuition about the best course of action for ourselves?

Wise decision-making becomes critical in times of crisis and much more challenging. With so many unknowns, we must rely on our intuition to a greater extent than ever. In times of uncertainty and conflicting information, emotional reactions fill the gaps and lead to terrible decisions. We catastrophize , we get fatalistic and even seriously depressed. We should not make decisions while in this state of mind.

In this “deep unknown”, when uncertainty and fear are magnified by a sense of urgency and untrustworthy information—taking advantage of the opportunity to slow down, use intuitive intelligence tools, and make better decisions can keep us both safe and connected. There’s no one-size-fits all solution here. Everyone’s chosen approach to living through the pandemic will look a little different and that’s okay. While you find your way, assess your acceptable level of risk, seek advice from trustworthy sources, and do what feels right to you; consider not only yourself but also collective safety.

This pandemic will not last forever. Beyond figuring out how to survive, let’s heed the call to be both more careful and more caring. Let’s strengthen our immune system, honor spiritual priorities and find our personal point of balance.

Perhaps the only certainty we can be sure of is that which we create through our commitments—perhaps to some healthy routines, rituals, and more conscious heartfelt relating. By shifting our perspective, fine-tuning our intuition, accepting what life brings—by focusing on what we can learn and do—we can keep hope alive even in the face of massive uncertainty and doubt.

The fog will lift, things will become clear, and this too shall pass. Like Victor Frankl, we have a choice between falling apart or coming out of this stronger and more aware. Find your balance and keep the faith.

Sexual Healing

Carolin Hauser-Carson is the author of the new book, Blossom: 7 Steps to Sexual Healing. An internationally-recognized speaker and teacher on the subjects of spirituality, healing, and women’s empowerment for almost two decades, Carolin combines her knowledge to help women (and brave men) to have abundant, love-filled lives that flow with a sense of ease. Her work is based on the intersection of where the human body and experience meets past–and even ancestral–trauma, and shows how each individual’s authentic and true self is the source of one’s own good – a place of unlimited abundance, creativity, courage, and joyful existence.

Childhood Adversity

Dr. Nadine Burke Harris is the author of the new book, The Deepest Well: Healing the Long-Term Effects of Childhood Adversity. She is a pioneering physician who is reshaping the conversation about childhood stress. In her book, she tells the story of what toxic stress is, how it affects children, the ways it leads to lifelong health problems (from obesity to heart disease to cancer)—and how to break the cycle.

The Forgotten Art of Love

Love plays a crucial role in every aspect of human existence, including sex, spirituality, society, and even the meaning of life. Dr. Armin Zadeh is the author of the new book The Forgotten Art of Love: What Love Means and Why it Matters. He is a cardiologist and professor at Johns Hopkins University. Dr. Zadeh has authored more than 100 scientific articles and is an editor of scholarly books in medicine.

The Self-Love Experiment

Shannon Kaiser is the author of the book, The Self-Love Experiment: Fifteen Principles for Becoming More Kind, Compassionate, and Accepting of Yourself. Shannon is also the author of Find Your Happy, which was featured on Pathways in 2013. She is a six-time contributing author to Chicken Soup for the Soul. Shannon has been named among the “top 100 women to watch in wellness” by Mind-Body-Green. She’s an international entrepreneur/life coach, travel writer, teacher, and inspirational speaker who left her job in advertising several years ago to follow her heart and become a writer.

Change the story of your health

Dr. Carl Greer is the author of the new book, Change the Story of Your Health: Using Shamanic and Jungian Techniques for Healing. Carl is a practicing clinical psychologist, Jungian analyst, and respected shamanic practitioner. He received his PhD from Columbia University and was on their faculty teaching finance and management in their graduate school of business. He moved to Chicago to work for an oil company and, after focusing on business for many years, he earned a doctorate in clinical psychology, and then became a Jungian analyst.

Listening to Ayahuasca

Dr. Rachel Harris is the author of the new book, Listening to Ayahuasca: New Hope for Depression, Addiction, PTSD, and Anxiety. She received a National Institutes of Health New Investigator’s Award, has published more than forty scientific studies in peer-reviewed journals, and has worked as a psychological consultant to Fortune 500 companies and the United Nations. Her background includes careers as a research psychologist as well as a psychotherapist.

Create Balance, Happiness, and Peace

Dr. Peter Borten is the co-author (along with his wife Briana Borton) of the new book, The Well Life: How to Use Structure, Sweetness, and Space to Create Balance, Happiness, and Peace. Briana and Peter are the creators of the Rituals of Living online community and Dragontree, a holistic wellness brand. Peter is a doctor of Asian medicine who helps people attain whole health of body and mind.

“Reboot” Your Life

Dianne Bischoff James is the author of The Real Brass Ring: Change Your Life Course Now. She is a “Life Reboot Expert” who encourages people to create a reality that is prosperous, deliberate and meaningful. She has been on her own transformational journey since 2002—losing 55 pounds, ridding herself of depression and numerous debilitating health problems, launching an acting career, a healthy divorce and surviving the perils of an addictive relationship, all after 40.

Mindful Health and the Power of Possibility

Ellen Langer, Ph.D., is the author of the book Counter Clockwise: Mindful Health and the Power of Possibility, which attempts to answer the question: If we could turn back the clock psychologically, could we also turn it back physically? Dr. Langer, a social psychologist, has been described as the “mother of mindfulness” and has written extensively on the illusion of control, mindful aging, stress, and decision-making. he is the author of eleven books and more than two hundred research articles written for general and academic readers on mindfulness for over 35 years.